<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d10582443\x26blogName\x3dPink+Lemon+Twist\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dBLUE\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttps://pinklemontwist.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://pinklemontwist.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d4292445769315597913', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Angel Cowl

Angel cowl 
I made a little crocheted cowl out of super soft and light weight Malabrigo Lace yarn.  The color was Plomo and I just kept crocheting until I ran out of yarn.  I used the Angel scarf pattern which is temporarily unavailable but I had downloaded it ages ago.  I decided to crochet it together to make it a cowl instead of a scarf.  The first picture shows it doubled, but you can see the length of the single loop in the photo below.
Angel cowl
Crocheting laceweight yarn on a 4.5 mm hook means you see progress pretty quickly.  Add in a simple, repetitive pattern and you've got a great project!  This was fun to do and in the light laceweight yarn, I can probably wear it most of the year here.
Angel cowl
In other news, Logan had a medical issue and while medically it wasn't a big deal, it meant he had to wear the Cone of Shame for four weeks.  Logan dealt with it by bashing into anyone and anything with the cone (I've got the bruises to prove it).  Max dealt with it by spending the first three weeks hissing, growling, and fully puffed at Logan.  The last week he decided he just didn't care anymore I guess.  Anyway, yesterday was Logan's post op and he's healing nicely and cone free this morning!  I can't even tell you how many happy dog noises he's made this morning.  We're all happy to get things back to normal!

Labels: ,

Wednesday, May 08, 2019

A New Cardigan

Sophie Cardigan 
I've been knitting on a cardigan lately and I've finished the body now.  This is the Sophie Cardigan, knit in Blue Sky Fibers Woolstok Worsted in Spring Ice.  I started it back in March but set it aside to knit my two fade shawls.

I've now finished the body and while I've sewn down the facing (there's a knitted on facing on the button band, giving a little bit more stability to that section), I haven't yet woven in any of the ends.  I plan to weave in ends before I start the sleeves, but to be honest I don't really want to.  On the other hand, I won't want to weave them in at the end either.

There's kind of a lot going on with this pattern, but once you get past the shoulder and neck shaping it becomes a lot easier.  I'd always rather deal with pattern complexities at the first part of a knit when it's fresh and exciting than at the end when I'm ready to get it finished and move on.  Even the various cable patterns are pretty easy to memorize, so I wasn't dependent on my charts for every single stitch.

The pattern has three-quarter length sleeves, but I'm thinking I might make it long sleeved.  I'll have to check my yarn amounts, but I think I'll be alright.

Labels:

Thursday, May 02, 2019

Scrappy Striped Socks

Scrappy Striped Socks 
A few weeks ago I saw a pair of socks on Pinterest.  They were plain stockinette socks with a ribbed cuff, but they were knit from fingering weight scraps left over from other projects.  I didn't even take time to pin the original idea (sorry) before I was upstairs sorting through my own leftovers!

I decided to use mainly pinks and reds with a little bit of orange and my tiny remaining bit of Cosmic Wonder Dust (the white speckled stripe in each leg).  I pulled 80 grams of yarn for this project and when I was done, I had three grams left - next time I'll get a little bit more just for breathing room!

Once I had my yarns, I carefully divided them in half and then bagged the halves separately so I'd have equal amounts of each yarn for each sock.  I could have just started knitting but I was afraid I'd end up with one sock more red than the other if I didn't divide the yarns.  I also picked specific yarns for cuffs, heels, and toes.  I felt like that would help tie the socks together as a pair.

I know what you're thinking - what about all those ends?  Well, I kind of cheated.  I didn't want to weave in thousands of ends either, so I did it as I went.  As I was getting ready to switch colors, I cut my working yarn about 10 inches long and then folded it back on itself.  Then I took the end of the next yarn and threaded it through the loop and let it fold back on itself about five inches.  Then I knit with the yarn doubled and when I ran out of the working yarn, the next stitch was the new yarn and I just kept going.  At the end I had some yarn tails to trim, but the only ends that needed weaving in were the beginning and ending ones!
Scrappy Striped Socks
The one thing about this end management technique is that the doubled yarn sections gave me fewer rows per inch than I usually get in fingering weight socks, so I almost went too far on the foot before beginning the toe decreases.  I should also note that I didn't start and stop new colors at the same place on the sock.  I rotated my joins around the circumference of the sock and just let the color jogs fall where they would.

This was such a great pair of socks to knit that I'll definitely be doing these again.  The random stripes were fun, but I started wondering if I could blend the colors from one shade to another - kind of a sock fade!

Labels:

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Another Faded Knit

Free Your Fade. 
When the Second Quarter KAL for ESK was announced as a fade project, I found two possible combinations in my stash.  I went back and forth between them for a bit, but then I thought, "Why not make both of them?"  My Stay Out of the Forest was my first fade project, but as soon as I finished it, I cast on for my second fade project - a Free Your Fade.
Free Your Fade.
This is knit exactly as the pattern is written using Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in Cousteau, which fades into Spectrum on the same yarn base, which then fades into Malabrigo Mechita in Aniversario.
Free Your Fade.
It's an easy knit and after the first couple of repeats, you barely need the pattern open while you knit.  I would definitely knit this again, in fact I'm thinking of trying a black/gray to white fade.  I love the jewel tones in this one, but I think a neutral one could be really useful.  I don't have any yarns for it in my stash, so I'll have to do some shopping first!
Free Your Fade.

Labels: ,

Friday, April 26, 2019

A Forest Dark

A Forest Dark 
I've finished my Stay Out of the Forest!  This is a seriously huge shawl, but the tails aren't in-the-way long like they would be if this was a triangle shawl.
A Forest Dark
I knit it in Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in Worn Denim, Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Dragonfly, Dream in Color Jilly in Galaxy, and Malabrigo Mechita in Whale's Road.
A Forest Dark
It was a fun knit, but at the end the rows were getting really long.  Like over half an hour to knit each row long.  It's been a long time since I knit a shawl with this general shaping.  I've been doing so many asymmetrical triangle shawls lately, I'd forgotten how long the last rows tend to be on symmetrical top down shawls.  On the other hand, it was super easy TV knitting that I could easily pick up and put down, which definitely made it a nice project!

Have a great weekend!

Labels:

Friday, April 05, 2019

A Forest Dark

A Forest Dark 
The second quarter KAL for ESK this year is a Fade Along, in other words, knit something that fades from one color to another.  I'm planning to do two fading projects, but I've only cast on my first one at this point.  I'm knitting Stay Out of the Forest using Madelinetosh Tosh Merino Light in Worn Denim (I had an extra skein left from my Aki cardigan earlier this year), Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles in Dragonfly, Dream in Color Jilly in Galaxy, and Malabrigo Mechita in Whale's Road (R to L in the picture). 
The Forest Dark
I took this picture yesterday afternoon, so it doesn't show last night's knitting but I'm currently through the first color (Worn Denim) and more than halfway through the second color (Dragonfly).  I'll start striping in the third color (Galaxy) in another couple of rows or so.  The knitting is easy to do, but the way the shawl is shaped, the rows are getting pretty long. 
The Forest Dark
I'll admit that I was a little concerned with how Worn Denim would fade into Dragonfly, but I'm actually really happy with how it looks.  The Dragonfly-Galaxy-Whale's Road fading will be smaller color jumps.

Labels: ,

Thursday, March 28, 2019

A Top For Warm Weather

As I've been knitting all these big, boxy sweaters this past fall and winter, I've really enjoyed the shape.  It's easy to wear, works with skinny jeans and ballet flats and feels like pajamas.  When I saw the Lou Box Top pattern I knew I had to sew up a few for warmer days (you know - spring, summer, fall).  It's not a new pattern, I'm just slow at finding it.
Lou Box Top
It can be used with knits and wovens; it comes with two neckline options and three hem options.  I made the straight hem option with the crew neck, using Cotton and Steel rayon fabric and really, this was the only thing tricky about this pattern.  The pattern itself is very simple.  There is a bias neck binding but they aren't really hard, just fiddly and you have to take your time.  The thing is, when a top is this boxy and oversized, it really needs to be made in drapey fabric.  Drapey fabrics tend to be a bit squirelly, but if you use a fabric that isn't drapey enough, the top is going to make you look like a box.  The rayon is perfect for this and I have two more pieces of it for two more of these.  The oversized nature of this top means it will be breezy in the summer heat and while sometimes there are sleeve issues with oversized tops (if the sleeves are too big, the world can sometimes get more of a show than you bargained for) these are perfect - no show, but not tight either.

I actually think this could be really great in a silk charmeuse or even a drapey crushed velvet for the holidays.  I don't have any definite plans for these, but the ideas are bouncing around in my head.

Labels: